TRANSPORTATION in Rome

GETTING TO & FROM THE CITY

 

BY AIR

Fiumicino Airport

(Leonardo da Vinci)

Rome’s main airport is well connected to the centre of town during the day by express and regular train services.

The express train between Fiumicino airport and Termini station costs €14,00 and takes approximately 30 minutes. This train departs from and arrives at track 24 at Stazione Termini, Rome’s main train station. Tickets can be bought at any tobacco shop and the newsstands inside the train station, at vending machines at both Termini and Fiumicino, , or at the ticket window by the platform at Fiumicino.

The following schedule is valid until December, 2013.

  • Fiumicino-Roma Termini: First train at 6:37am, and then every 30 minutes until the last train at 11:37pm.

Roma Termini-Fiumicino: First train at 5:52am, and then every 30 minutes until the last train at 10:52pm.

There is another train that connects Fiumicino airport to central Rome-it’s slower but costs less than the express train. When you are at the airport railway station look for the train with the destination Orte or Fara Sabina- it’s the one that’s not the Leonardo Express. It stops at some smaller local stations along the way into Rome but does NOT stop at Termini. To access central Rome, get off at Ostiense (south of the centre, closer to the sights) or Tiburtina (east of the centre, closer to Termini and the hotels there). Metro B and many buses connect Ostiense and Tiburtina stations with the centre of town. These trains leave every 15 minutes (every hour on Sundays) and cost €8. The trip from the airport to Ostiense takes about 25 minutes, to Tiburtina about 45 minutes.

Fiumicino

Airport-Trastevere-Ostiense-Tiburtina: 5:57am-11:27pm

Tiburtina-Ostiense-Trastevere-Fiumicino Airport: 5:06am-10:36pm

To reach Termini from:

Ostiense: take Metro B or bus 175

Tiburtina: take Metro B or bus 649 or 492

Trastevere: Tram 8 to Largo Argentina and bus 40 or 64

For arrivals and departures between 11:30pm and 6am, there is a night bus running between Fiumicino airport and Tiburtina station run by COTRAL ( information www.cotralspa.it ), €7 on the bus. It stops at Termini station along the way, across the street from Palazzo Massimo at the time of printing, although you’ll have to look very hard for the sign.

From Fiumicino: 1:15am / 2:15am / 3:30am /5am

From Tiburtina: 12:30am / 1:15am / 2:30am / 3:45am

Ciampino Airport

Ciampino is Rome’s smaller airport, used mostly by budget airlines and charter flights. To get to the centre of Rome from Ciampino there are coaches run by Terravision (www.terravision.it). The bus costs €4 single; €8 return which go to the Termini railway station. Tickets can be bought either at the Terravision office at Ciampino, or at Terravision office in via Marsala by Termini -where the bus leaves from for the journey back to the airport.

It’s cheaper, 1,20 Euro, (and so inevitably longer and less convenient) to take the COTRAL bus (€1) to Metro A: Anagnina, and then take the metro (€1) to Termini. COTRAL buses run every 30 minutes until 10.40pm from Ciampino and until 11.10pm from Anagnina.

There is also a new Cotral bus line (€5) that reaches Termini station .It doesn’t run very often, but the last bus from Ciampino leaves at 12:30am ( from Termini at 8pm). It leaves from Piazza dei Cinquecento.

Taxis from the airports

The average fare for a taxi ride from Fiumicino or Ciampino airports to central Rome is €40  inclusive of luggage.

Anyone offering taxi services from inside the terminal is doing so illegally, and they also charge outrageous prices. The official taxi rank is located along the kerb outside the terminal. Make sure your taxi has a meter, and insist on the metered fare rather than an arranged price. See more about fair taxi practices in the “Advice” chapter and in the box below.

BY TRAIN

All Eurostar and most inter-city trains arrive at Termini station. A few trains, particularly those arriving late at night, may arrive at Tiburtina or Ostiense stations.

Termini Station

Returning visitors to Rome will be surprised by how nice a place Termini station has become. The once-seedy hub of Rome’s transport system has been cleaned up, brightened, and revamped, with all kinds of shopping opportunities, restaurants, and. Trains depart from here for all Italian cities, big and small, as well as Paris, Munich, Nice, and Vienna. Accessed by several sets of escalators along the main gallery, an underground shopping centre (“Forum Termini”) with tons of useful stuff– there are shops like Benetton, Ricordi MediaStore (CDs and tapes), and CONAD (a late-opening supermarket). There are also Internet access points, an optician, a pharmacy, a post office and even a gym (in the Ala Termini wing along Via Giolitti). There are public showers on the lower level, and a small COIN department store in the retail wing near track 22. And, as no place in Rome can avoid archaeology, the downstairs McDonald’s has 5th century BC Roman ruins. From this lower level you can also get to the city’s two subway lines, Metro A and Metro B. Back on the street level, continuing away from the platforms past the main gallery, you will reach the main hall, where the ticket and reservation windows are located. There are also yellow, multi-lingual self-service train ticket machines in the main hall which accept cash as well as credit and ATM cards–incredibly convenient (and polite), as queues at the human-powered ticket booths are miles long and slow-moving. To the west of the main hall is Piazza dei Cinquecento, a major hub for Rome’s bus system.

Services at Termini include:

 

- Luggage Storage: open 7am-midnight daily by track 24 on the lower level (€3.80) per item for 5 hours).

– Police and Carabinieri Stations: Lost or stolen luggage or documents should be reported here within 24 hours of the loss or theft.

– Tourist Office

– Post Office

– Buses and Taxis: Can be found directly outside the station, in Piazza Cinquecento.

– Ticket and reservation windows

– Eurail and Train Information Office: English spoken most of the time.

– ATMs: and Banca S. Paolo di Torino.

– COIN (small department store)

In all major Italian train stations you’ll find an office dedicated to facilitating train travel for disabled people. Upon request (at least 24 hours in advance for Italian trains; three working days in advance for international trains) these centres can organize transportation for disabled people around the railway stations of departure and arrival. Other services include wheelchair use, luggage transport, and train information.

  • Termini Station: 06 4881726.
  • Tiburtina Station: 06
  • Fiumicino Airport Station: 06 65011821.

Tiburtina Station

 

The second biggest train station in Rome, easily accessible by bus and metro (Metro B) from the centre. The slower and cheaper train and also the night bus to Fiumicino airport leave from here. Facilities at the station include a 24-hour supermarket and a currency exchange office. Across the (fairly horrible) piazza in front of the station you will find the buses that depart for destinations all over Italy and abroad. The ticket offices are located nearby in the piazza and around the corner on Circonvallazione Nomentana. From Termini, take Metro B to Tiburtina or bus 649 to the end of the line.

 

Reading Italian Train Timetables

The easiest way to get timetable information is to use the ticket machines.

If you prefer more traditional methods it gets more complicated. There are train timetables posted throughout the station; for departures, look for the schedules marked “partenze.” In addition to the immense permanent tables located high above eye-level, there are numerous yellow posters with more extensive and current information. To find out if a train goes to the city you are trying to reach, you should check not only the Final Destination column on these yellow posters, but the Principali Fermate (major stops) or Annotazioni columns as well. The trains that are listed in green type (and sometimes in black for night trains) are the normal slower trains; trains listed in red type (IC, EC, EN, and ICN) are faster and more expensive; ES* (Eurostar) trains, the fastest and all-around most pleasant, are even more expensive and require reservations, which can sometimes be made last-minute, but we recommend booking for the Eurostar at least 24 hours in advance (at least two days for weekend trains).

Useful Train Information

It’s a good idea to buy your train tickets at least one day before the day of travel, as seat reservations cannot be made on the same day as the trip. The ticket office lines at Termini station are often long and slow-moving, but train tickets can also be purchased at almost any travel agent in the city – look for “FS” or “biglietti treni” signs in the window – or at the yellow self-service machines in the stations themselves.

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Important reminder: You must validate (time-stamp) your ticket at the orange boxes on the platform before boarding any train in Italy. This is true for all tickets (local, regional, IC, EC, Kilometric), except the Eurostar and Eurail Pass.

The official website of the Italian train system is www.trenitalia.com – multi-lingual and very user-friendly.

Sample train prices and travel times

Prices listed are for 2nd class travel; one-way. (Updated Apr, 2006)

D=diretto[ R= regionale; IR=interregionale E or EN=night train] (the slow train); IC=Inter-city; ES=Eurostar

  • Rome-Florence: R 3h40min _ 15.80 IC 2h30min _27.50; ES 1h35min _36.10.
  • Rome-Naples: IR 2h40min _10.50; IC 1h55min _19.50; ES 1h50min _27.60.
  • Rome-Milan: EN overnight 7h+ _31.50; IC 6h05min _45.00; ES 4h30min _56.10.
  • Rome-Venice: E overnight _36.50; IC 5h30min _41.50; ES 4h30min _56.10.

Rome-Brindisi: E overnight 9h+ _31.50; ES 5h53min _51.30

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GETTING TO ROME BY CAR

It’s still true that wherever you are in Italy, tutte le strade portano a Roma (“all roads lead to Rome”). In the days of the Caesars it was much easier – any of the consular roads would eventually lead you and your chariot right into the Roman Forum. However, 2000 years of urban development and restrictions on traffic in the historical centre have made it very difficult for modern vehicles to reach the tourist areas of Rome. If you are determined to make the journey by car, brace yourself for traffic, chaos, impatience, creative interpretation of lanes, and one of the world’s most comprehensive one-way systems forcing you inexorably away from the direction you want to follow. As for parking in Rome, you’re more likely to find the Holy Grail than a legal place to leave your vehicle- and even if you do get lucky there’ll be enough angry sounding of horns while you’re trying to squeeze in to stress the most unflappable of characters. The ZTL (zona traffico limitata) doesn’t allow non-resident cars into the historic centre during the day (8am to 6pm) Monday to Friday and Saturday mornings (8am to 1pm)

If this doesn’t put you off

To reach the centre: If you are on the A1 motorway (autostrada) arriving from the north, take the exit marked “Roma nord.” If you are on the A1 motorway arriving from the south, take the “Roma est” exit. Keep following the bulls-eye signs for the “centro.” After a few kilometres, both of these exits take you to the GRA (Grande Raccordo Anulare), the ring road around the city linking the motorways and the strade statali (state roads, marked SS). The most important strade statali for the traveller are the Via Aurelia (Pisa, Livorno, Genova), the Via Cassia (Viterbo, Siena), the Via Flaminia (Umbria), the Via Tiburtina (Tivoli), the Via Appia Nuova (Ciampino airport and Castelli Romani), the Via Pontina (Circeo, Latina, Sabaudia, Sperlonga), and Via Cristoforo Colombo (Ostia). From the GRA you will also find the exit for the Autostrada Fiumicino for Fiumicino-Leonardo da Vinci airport and the A24 highway to the Parco Nazionale d’Abruzzo and Pescara.

Parking

Non-resident cars are not allowed to drive in the historical centre. If you are bringing a car to Rome, try parking in the Termini or Vatican area. As for seeing the sights, you’ll do much better getting around with a combination of public transport and your own two feet.

In central Rome there are spaces indicated by blue lines where you can park for _1.00 per hour. The hours of the day when you have to pay for parking are usually 8am to 8pm, and until 11pm in some parts of town. Parking payment tickets can be purchased either at the vending machines (coins only) by the parking area, or the scratch cards from tabacchi, or newsstands (a bit like lottery tickets on which you need to scratch off the date and time). There are also some large public and private parking garages around the city. The most accessible are ParkSi (in the Villa Borghese; _1.30 per hour for the first three hours, _1 per hour from four to 15 hours, or _16 per day) and handy for the shopping areas around Piazza di Spagna, Parking Ludovisi (Via Ludovisi 60, open 5:30am-1:30am. 1st to 5th hour _2 per hour, 6th hour onwards _1 per hour or _18 per day), and Parking Termini (in front of the main train station, open 6am-1am; _5 for 2 hours, _1.55 per hour from the third to the twelfth hour, _0.70 per hour after 12 hours,Euro 21,69 per day). Parcheggi di scambio are less expensive parking lots located near metro stations a bit further away from the historical center of Rome (like Anagnina and Cinecittà on Metro A, or Ponte Mammolo on Metro B). From there you can simply take the metro into the centre. At _1.55 per day, the parking is very economical, but the car-parks are unattended.

 

 

GETTING TO ROME BY BUS

Tiburtina station is the main bus terminal for buses coming from or going to cities outside the Lazio region. To reach the centre from Tiburtina take Metro B in the direction of Termini, or bus 649 or 492 from the piazza in front of the station.

ONCE YOU’RE HERE…GETTING AROUND

Stop! GET A MAP!

Before reading any further, orient yourself with a good map (the kind that actually shows street names, not just the location of every Mcdonald’s in the city). Such Maps are available for free at the city information kiosks and Enjoy Rome in Via Marghera 8 A

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PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

Tickets must be purchased in advance from tabacchi, newsstands, bars, or vending machines at metro stations and major bus stops.

B.I.T. Standard ticket: €1.50, valid for 100 minutes on all buses (including electric buses, night buses) and trams, or one metro ride and one transfer within 75 minutes.

B.I.G. Daily ticket: €6.00, valid for unlimited metro, bus, and train travel within the Comune di Roma. This includes Ostia but not Fiumicino airport or Tivoli.

B.T.I. 3-Day tourist ticket: €16.50, valid for everything listed under the B.I.G. ticket.

C.I.S. Weekly ticket: €24.00, valid for everything listed under the B.I.G. ticket.

There are currently two formats of tickets in use – the old ticket is small and made of heavy paper; the new ticket is credit-card size, with a magnetic strip. Don’t worry about which one you get – they are both valid… as long as you VALIDATE them!

About that free fare

The bus and metro system is NOT free despite appearances- random ticket inspections do take place. For the metro, validate your ticket before boarding the train; for the bus, look for the validation machines onboard. For the old (small paper) tickets, the validation machines are orange; for the new (magnetic) tickets, the validation machines are yellow. If you are caught without a validated ticket, the fine is €51.

For more information about public transportation, call 800 431784 (Toll-free, in service Mon-Fri, 8am-6pm. Some English spoken.). Or visit www.atac.roma.it, the official site of Rome’s public transportation system.

Safety on the bus and Metro

Rome is one of the safest capital cities in the world, but you should be extremely careful of pickpockets on crowded buses and metro trains. Carry your money and other valuables in a secure bag or money belt in front of you, and always keep an eye on where other people’s hands are. See the “Advice” chapter for more information.

THE METRO

The metro system has only two lines, A (red) and B (blue), which cross at Termini. Trains run approximately every 7-10 minutes, from 5:30am until 11:30pm every day (until 12:30am on Saturdays). The metro stations on Line A do not have handicapped facilities (except Cipro-Musei Vaticani and Valle Aurelia); alternatively, bus 590 does the same route as the metro line and has wheelchair access. (See list of useful bus lines below.) All the metro stations on Line B are fully wheelchair accessible except Circo Massimo, Colosseo, and Cavour (Cavour is accessible only at the Laurentina entrance).

METRO LINE C: In the works… maybe.

You’ll find that the metro doesn’t go to many places that you want to visit, in the historical centre you need to make use of either your feet or the buses. There’s so much of ancient Rome beneath the modern city that they can’t dig a tunnel for the trains without running into 2,000-year-old brick walls, mosaic pavements, and marble columns (you can see some evidence of this in the Repubblica and Termini stations), and below all that is the sandy soil ridden with natural springs which supply the city’s drinking fountains. So, far from an ideal situation for tunnelling… However, the city transportation authority has begun surveying the ground beneath the centro storico for a possible new metro line, Linea C. If built, Linea C would serve such central areas as Piazza Venezia and Largo Argentina, where subterranean ruins are dense. Line C’s stations would incorporate the exposed antiquities, and its tunnels would have glass walls to allow commuters and tourists a view of the buried city. However, given that lines A and B took twenty years to open, I shouldn’t hold your breath

 

Useful Metro Stops

 

  • Spanish Steps: Metro A: Spagna
  • Vatican Museums: Metro A: Ottaviano
  • St. Peter’s Basilica: Metro A: Ottaviano
  • Colosseum: Metro B: Colosseo
  • Circus Maximus, Baths of Caracalla and Aventine Hill: Metro B: Circo Massimo
  • Appian Way and Catacombs: Metro B: Piramide, then bus 118 OR Metro A: Colli Albani, then bus 660

REGULAR BUSES

There are hundreds of bus lines, running from 5:30am-midnight. All buses travel in both directions.The most useful for the visitor are:

40 Express: Termini / Via Nazionale / Piazza Venezia / Largo Argentina / Chiesa Nuova / Piazza Pia (for Castel S. Angelo and St. Peter’s).

The infamous bus 64 does more-or-less the same route as the 40, with more stops, but it’s generally packed and is therefore a particular favourite with pickpockets (and bottom-pivnchers), so we recommend the 40 instead. If you do take the 64 keep an especially vigilant eye on your belongings.

H: Termini / Via Nazionale / Piazza Venezia / Largo Argentina / Ponte Garibaldi / Viale Trastevere / (then continues into the western suburbs)

271: Viale San Paolo / Via Ostiense / Piramide / Viale Aventino / Circo Massimo / Colosseo / Piazza Venezia / Via del Teatro di Marcello / Lungotevere (Ghetto, Ponte Sisto) / Ponte Vittorio Emanuele / Castel Sant’Angelo / Via Crescenzio / Piazza Risorgimento (Vatican Museums/ St. Peter’s) / Ottaviano / Viale Angelico / Foro Italico (Stadio Olimpico)

571: Porta Maggiore / San Giovanni / Colosseo / Piazza Venezia / Largo Argentina / Corso Vittorio Emanuele / Via Gregorio VII (south wall of Vatican City)

8 Tram: Connects the historic centre with Trastevere. Largo Argentina / Ponte Garibaldi / Piazza G.G. Belli / Piazza Mastai / Piazza Ippolito Nievo / Stazione Trastevere / Monteverde / Casaletto

3 Tram: Stazione Trastevere (one of the stops of the cheaper train from Fiumicino Airport) / Viale Trastevere / Ponte Sublicio / Via Marmorata / Piramide / Viale Aventino / Circo Massimo / Villa Celimontana / Colosseo / San Giovanni / Porta Maggiore / San Lorenzo / Viale Regina Margherita / Nomentana / Trieste / Parioli / Villa Borghese (Piazza Thorwaldsen)

19 Tram: Piazza Risorgimento (Vatican) / Prati / Via Flaminia / Villa Giulia / Parioli / Trieste / Viale Regina Margherita / San Lorenzo / eastern suburbs

492: Stazione Tiburtina / San Lorenzo / Termini / Piazza Barberini / Piazza Venezia / Corso Rinascimento / Piazza Cavour / Piazza Risorgimento / Cipro-Vatican Museums (Metro A)

175: Termini / Piazza Barberini / Via del Corso / Piazza Venezia / Teatro di Marcello / Aventino / Stazione Ostiense

23: Piazzale Clodio / Piazza Risorgimento / Ponte Vittorio Emanuele II / Lungotevere / Ponte Garibaldi / Lungotevere / Via Marmorata / Piramide / Basilica di S. Paolo

30 Express: Piazzale Clodio / Piazza Mazzini / Piazza Cavour / Corso Rinascimento / Largo Argentina / Piazza Venezia / Via del Teatro di Marcello / Lungotevere Aventino / Via Marmorata / Piramide / Via Cristoforo Colombo / EUR

170: Termini / Via Nazionale / Piazza Venezia / Via del Teatro di Marcello / Bocca della Verità / (then south to Testaccio and EUR, ending at Piazzale dell’Agricoltura)

118: Piramide / Viale Aventino / Circo Massimo / Terme di Caracalla / Via di Porta San Sebastiano / Via Appia Antica (catacombs of San Callisto and San Sebastiano) / Via Appia Pignatelli / Quarto Miglio

714: Termini / Piazza S. Maria Maggiore / Piazza S. Giovanni in Laterano / Viale delle Terme di Caracalla / (then south to EUR, ending at Piazzale P.L. Nervi)

660: Largo Colli Albani / Via Appia Nuova / Via Appia Antica (near the Tomb of Cecilia Metella).

910: Termini / Piazza della Repubblica / Via Piemonte / Via Pinciana (Villa Borghese) / Piazza Euclide / Palazzetto dello Sport / Piazza Mancini

Access for the disabled

590: Follows the same route as Metro A, but it runs every 90 minutes (schedule posted at the bus stops).

On other routes approximately half of the current fleet of buses and trams is accessible to the disabled, including the newer long green express buses (lines 40, 30, 170), and the new green trams (always in use on line 8, more and more in use on other lines) and the situation is constantly being improved.

Electric buses

In an effort to minimize pollution in the small backstreets of the centro storico, the city has established several electric bus lines to navigate alleyways barely wide enough for a Vespa. They do not run on Sundays.

115: Trastevere and Gianicolo (Janiculum hill) circuit; starts at Lungotevere degli Anguillara at Piazza GG Belli

116: Via Veneto / Piazza Barberini / Piazza di Spagna / Corso Rinascimento / Campo de’ Fiori / Piazza Farnese / Via Monserrato / Via Giulia / Teminal Gianicolo / Via Giulia / Campo de’ Fiori / Corso Rinascimento / Pantheon / Piazza Colonna / Piazza Barberini / Via Veneto (It also does a loop inside the Villa Borghese, stopping near the Galleria Borghese, before making its final stop at the top of Via Veneto.)

117: Piazza S. Giovanni in Laterano / Piazza del Colosseo / Via dei Serpenti / Largo Tritone / Piazza di Spagna / Piazza del Popolo / Via del Corso / Piazza Venezia / Piazza del Colosseo / Via Labicana / Piazza S. Giovanni in Laterano

119: Piazza del Popolo / Via del Corso / Largo Goldoni / Piazza Venezia / Via del Tritone / Piazza Barberini / Piazza di Spagna / Via del Babuino / Piazza del Popolo

NIGHT BUSES

Over 20 night bus lines run from 12:30am to 5:30am. The main terminal stations are Termini (Piazza dei Cinquecento) and Piazza Venezia. From these two piazzas buses leave for all directions every 30 minutes. Night bus stops are marked with an owl. You can purchase tickets on board; the price is €1. The most useful night bus routes:

N7: Piazzale Clodio / Piazzale Flaminio / Piazza Cavour / Largo di Torre Argentina / Piazza Venezia / Via Nazionale / Stazione Termini. A good bus to know if your hotel is near Termini but you plan to be out late in the historic centre.

N2: Same route as Metro B. Good connection between Testaccio (use the stop at Piramide, in Piazzale Ostiense) and Termini, or if you need to catch a night train from Tiburtina station.

N1: Same route as Metro A.

N10: Piazzale Ostiense / Lungotevere Aventino / Lungotevere de’ Cenci (across the Tiber from Trastevere) / Via Crescenzio (Vatican area) / Via Barletta / Piazza Marina (Flaminio) / Via Belle Arti / Viale Liegi (Parioli) / Viale Regina Margherita / Via dei Marrucini (San Lorenzo) / Via Labicana (Colosseum) / Viale Aventino / Piazzale Ostiense

Useful bus lines

  • Vatican: From Termini, 40 Express or 64. From the Colosseum, 271 or 81, or walk 5 minutes to Piazza Venezia, then 40 Express or 64. From Trastevere, 23 (across the river at Lungotevere de’ Cenci).
  • Spanish Steps & Trevi Fountain: From Termini, 492 or 175 to Via del Tritone

From the Vatican, 62 or 492 to Via del Tritone. From Trastevere, Tram 8 to Largo Argentina then 62 or 492 to Via del Tritone.

  • Colosseum: From Termini, 75; or 40 Express, 170, or 64 to Piazza Venezia, then walk for 5 minutes. From Vatican, 81 from Piazza Risorgimento, or 40 Express, 64 or 62 to Piazza Venezia. From Trastevere, Tram 8 to Largo Argentina, then bus 87; or tram 3.
  • Pantheon, Piazza Navona & Campo de’ Fiori: From Termini, 40 Express or 64 to Largo Argentina. From the Vatican, 40 Express, 64 or 62 to Largo Argentina. From Trastevere, don’t be lazy–cross the bridge and walk for 5 minutes!
  • Trastevere: From Termini, H to Viale Trastevere, or 40 Express or 64 to Largo Argentina, then Tram 8 to Viale Trastevere. From the Vatican, 23, 271 or 280 to Ponte Sisto, Ponte Garibaldi, or Ponte Cestio.

Other ways of getting around

Taxis

If you need a taxi, remember to look for the official metered white or yellow taxis. It’s nearly impossible to hail one driving down the street but there are taxi ranks throughout the centre. Make sure your taxi is metered; and avoid pre-arranged prices. To call for a cab in Rome, try 06 3570, 06 4994, 06 6645, 06 5551, or 06 8822.

 

The system of taxi fares is mind-bogglingly complicated:

The meter starts at e 2.33 from 7am-10pm Mon-Sat (excluding holidays); e 4.91 from 10pm-7am every day; f 3.36 from 7am-10pm Sundays and holidays. “Scatti” (clicks of the meter) in the city are e 0.11 per 19.2 seconds at speeds under 20km/h; e 0.78 per 141m at speeds over 20km/h. Outside the city, “scatti” are e1.29 per 85.3m at speeds over 20km/h. “In the city” is defined as inside or on the Grande Raccordo Anulare (GRA), the ring-shaped highway that surrounds Rome. “Outside the city” is defined as outside the GRA. There is a charge of e1.04 per piece of luggage larger than 35x25x50cm. Do not feel obliged to leave a tip if service has not been good. If you would like to leave a gratuity, round up to the next euro amount. For example, if your fare is €6.30, or even €6.60, give the driver €7.

See the “Advice” chapter for more information about fair taxi practices and prices.

 

FIXED RATES FROM AND TO THE AIRPORTS
€40  from Fiumicino to within the Aurelian Walls and vice versa
€30 from Ciampino to within the Aurelian Walls and vice versa

CITY OF ROME – TAXI SERVICE FROM FIUMICINO AIRPORT TO ROME AND VICE VERSA.
At the Fiumicino Airport, near exits A, B and C, there is a taxi service for Rome. The cost of the taxi service is 40 euro, inclusive of luggage, for a maximum of four passengers, for all destinations within the Aurelian Walls delimiting the central area of the city. For further information check with the P.I.T. – Tourist Information Point of the City of Rome inside the airport, which will explain the service and let you know whether your particular destination is subject to the fixed rate. The cost of the service is the same for the opposite direction also, going from Rome to Fiumicino. For destinations outside of the central area of the city, the cost will be indicated by the taximeter, to which the luggage fee must be added.
Vehicles providing the City of Rome taxi service are white and have a “TAXI” sign on their roof, as well as an identifying number on their doors, on the rear, and inside the vehicle. In the area around the exit it is also possible to find a rental service, indicated with the initials NCC (“noleggio con conducente” – rental with driver), which is generally provided with blue or grey cars that apply different rates depending on the destination. This service may be requested, at the time of departure or arrival, at the authorized structures inside the airport. The NCC is therefore not an alternative taxi service, which is the only service accessible directly at the parking area.
Warning: Any other vehicles present near exits A, B and C could be driven by persons who do not possess the official Taxi or Rental authorization, and the fare demanded could be higher; in any case these rates are beyond the City of Rome’s control.
Beware of any individuals who, inside the airport, offer transportation services into the city.

CITY OF ROME – TAXI SERVICE FROM CIAMPINO AIRPORT TO ROME AND VICE VERSA.

At Ciampino Airport, near the exit, there is a taxi service for Rome. The cost of the taxi service is 30 euro, inclusive of luggage, for a maximum of four passengers, for all destinations within the Aurelian Walls delimiting the central area of the city. The cost of the service is the same for the opposite direction also, going from Rome to Ciampino.
For destinations outside of the central area of the city, the cost will be indicated by the taximeter, to which the luggage fee must be added.
Vehicles providing the City of Rome taxi service are white and have a “TAXI” sign on their roof, as well as an identifying number on their doors, on the rear, and inside the vehicle. In the area around the exit it is also possible to find a rental service, indicated with the initials NCC (“noleggio con conducente” – rental with driver), which is generally provided with blue or grey cars that apply different rates depending on the destination. This service may be requested, at the time of departure or arrival, at the authorized structures inside the airport. The NCC is therefore not
an alternative taxi service, which is the only service accessible directly at the parking area.
Warning: Any other vehicles present near the exit could be driven by persons who do not possess the official Taxi or Rental authorization, and the fare demanded could be higher; in any case these rates are beyond the City of Rome’s control.
Beware of any individuals who, inside the airport, offer transportation services into the city.

 

 

 

 

Walking

Although modern metropolitan Rome is spread out all along the arterial roads, the historic centre of the city is really quite compact and walkable, and the famous Seven Hills don’t really challenge your physical fitness. So if you’re tired of trying to figure out where the bus stops and metro stations are, just put one foot in front of the other and you’ll find that the distances are very manageable. Walking around is the best way to get oriented, and even if you do get lost, you’ll no doubt run across something like a Baroque fountain or ancient marble fragment that will make your wrong turns worthwhile.

Renting bikes or scooters

Although most of the sights in Rome are within walking distance or accessible by public transportation, two wheels will give you the freedom to see exactly what interests you, and in less time. To really “do as the Romans do”, you’ll have to drive around on a Vespa or other make of motorino – but Rome is definitely not the place to learn how to operate a scooter. If you think you can handle it, you’ll have no trouble finding rental places all around the city (rentals average €40-€50 for one day). Another way to see the city is by bicycle–better for the parks or Sunday mornings when the traffic isn’t too chaotic (particularly as most Sundays the Via dei Fori Imperiali and Via Appia Antica are closed to traffic).

CAUTION!

A word of caution regarding biking in Rome: Roman drivers are not terribly accustomed to seeing bicycles on their streets– don’t assume that they see you or will make room for you. And when you see a green light in front of you, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the intersection is clear. Many Roman drivers read a yellow light as “speed up” instead of “slow down.”

Rollerblades

In-line skates can be rented at the Villa Borghese. Helmets and kneepads are available-and highly recommended. We also suggest that you limit your blading to the confines of the park instead of tempting fate amidst the traffic in the city below.